Select Page

The Respect Rundown

Rundown logoGET THE RUNDOWN!

The Respect Rundown is an update blog for the Foundation’s diversity newsletter, Respect, published FREE three times a year. Posts for the Rundown will update a story that was recently published in Respect but has had some development since publication. Posts will be added periodically. Check back often to get the Rundown!

NOTE: Beginning with the fall 2019 edition of Respect, we will be posting to the blog stories that have been published in the newspaper (complete with discussion questions) so they may be used as individual handouts.

If you would like a FREE subscription to Respect click here. You can also take out a digital-only subscription here. You can check out back issues of Respect with the Respect toggle on our Publications Page.

Court Decisions Preserve DACA For Now

Court Decisions Preserve DACA For Now

by Maria Wood In 1875 the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the regulation of immigration is a federal responsibility and in the 1880s Congress passed its first piece of immigration legislation, according to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The...

LGBTQ Community Makes Strides with Recent Ruling

LGBTQ Community Makes Strides with Recent Ruling

by Phyllis Raybin Emert LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer or Questioning) rights in the United States have advanced over the past decades. Members of the LGBTQ community, however, still face discrimination that others do not. A recent U.S. Supreme Court...

Redlining Making a Comeback, But in Reverse

Redlining Making a Comeback, But in Reverse

by Michael Barbella There was a time in our nation’s history when it was hard for people of color, particularly African Americans, to buy homes. Mortgage lenders subjected minorities to the discriminatory, unethical and illegal practice of redlining, effectively...

Reform Efforts to Police the Police

Reform Efforts to Police the Police

by Michael Barbella Michael Brown. Tamir Rice. Eric Garner. Philando Castile. You may recognize the names. They have two things in common—all were killed at the hands of the police and they are all African American. Many more names could be added to the list....

White Supremacy Rises Across the Nation

White Supremacy Rises Across the Nation

by Jodi L. Miller The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) defines white supremacy as a term that characterizes an ideology, which goes beyond racism or bigotry. This ideology seems to be on the rise. Time Magazine reported that in June 2020 alone Facebook removed 190...

History Tells Us that Protests Can Bring Change

History Tells Us that Protests Can Bring Change

by Maria Wood The killing of George Floyd during an arrest by Minneapolis police in May 2020 ignited protests across the nation calling for police reform and an end to systemic racism. According to data from Civis Analytics, a data science firm, as many as 26 million...

Famous Protests That Made a Difference

Famous Protests That Made a Difference

The right to protest has deep roots in our nation. The United States was founded on it, and Americans hold the right dear. As the accompanying article mentioned, the Black Lives Matter protests have been the largest in our country’s history, with more than 1,300...

Women’s Suffrage, 100 Years and Counting

Women’s Suffrage, 100 Years and Counting

by Jodi L. Miller On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment, which granted suffrage to women, was ratified by the states. It was a stunning achievement, representing the single largest influx of voters to the electorate in American history. The Women’s Suffrage Movement...

A Victory For Some, Not For All

A Victory For Some, Not For All

by Jodi L. Miller For some women the passage of the 19th Amendment wasn’t the end of the journey, but the beginning of a new struggle. While the 19th Amendment stated that a citizen’s right to vote “shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State...

Suffragist or Suffragette?

Suffragist or Suffragette?

A suffragist is someone that advocates for the right to vote. A British journalist coined the label “suffragette” to mock suffragists in England. Adding the suffix “ette” to a word creates a noun that refers to something smaller. So, the word suffragette was intended...