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The Respect Rundown

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The Respect Rundown is an update blog for the Foundation’s diversity newsletter, Respect, published FREE three times a year. Posts for the Rundown will update a story that was recently published in Respect but has had some development since publication. Posts will be added periodically. Check back often to get the Rundown!

NOTE: Beginning with the fall 2019 edition of Respect, we will be posting to the blog stories that have been published in the newspaper (complete with discussion questions) so they may be used as individual handouts.

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Women’s Suffrage, 100 Years and Counting

Women’s Suffrage, 100 Years and Counting

by Jodi L. Miller On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment, which granted suffrage to women, was ratified by the states. It was a stunning achievement, representing the single largest influx of voters to the electorate in American history. The Women’s Suffrage Movement...

A Victory For Some, Not For All

A Victory For Some, Not For All

by Jodi L. Miller For some women the passage of the 19th Amendment wasn’t the end of the journey, but the beginning of a new struggle. While the 19th Amendment stated that a citizen’s right to vote “shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State...

Suffragist or Suffragette?

Suffragist or Suffragette?

A suffragist is someone that advocates for the right to vote. A British journalist coined the label “suffragette” to mock suffragists in England. Adding the suffix “ette” to a word creates a noun that refers to something smaller. So, the word suffragette was intended...

Hard to Be A Woman and More Expensive Too

Hard to Be A Woman and More Expensive Too

by Phyllis Raybin Emert While women have made great strides over the past 100 years, they haven’t achieved full equality in society. A woman still only earns about 80 cents for every dollar a man earns. According to a report published by the office of New York...

School Dress Codes Present Double Standard

School Dress Codes Present Double Standard

by Michael Barbella School dress codes have existed for decades. Today, according to statistics, across the nation 46 percent of primary schools, 70 percent of middle schools and 55 percent of high schools follow strict dress codes. Critics think dress code policies...

Long-Awaited Decision Not a Piece of Cake

Long-Awaited Decision Not a Piece of Cake

by Maria Wood Freedom of religion is a hot button issue for most Americans, and so is the protection of LGBTQ rights. So when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission, a case in which a Colorado baker declined to...

Harvard Lawsuit Tests Limits of Affirmative Action

Harvard Lawsuit Tests Limits of Affirmative Action

by Maria Wood It would be great if everyone who applied to higher education were judged on merit alone and affirmative action was not needed. But, as Andre M. Perry, an education advocate who focuses on race and inequality, wrote in a column, “The historic denial of...

Explaining the Roots of Institutional Racism

Explaining the Roots of Institutional Racism

by Phyllis Raybin Emert Individual acts of racism are easy to identify. A young white man shoots members of a black church. The n-word is painted on a family’s home. Black people are beaten or terrorized because of the color of their skin. Instances of institutional...

School Discipline Harsher for Black Students

School Discipline Harsher for Black Students

by Michael Barbella The way a disciplinary incident involving a sixth-grader was handled at a school in Florida is reflective of the racial bias that has existed in American school discipline policies for at least half a century, according to a 2018 report issued by...