Selecting the Perfect Jury Without Bias

Selecting the Perfect Jury Without Bias

by Maria Wood In general, attorneys—whether on the defense or prosecution—want to obtain a jury that is favorable to their side. The practice of jury selection, however, has come under scrutiny because of the potential for prosecutors to exclude jurors based on race....
250 Years of Seeking Reparations

250 Years of Seeking Reparations

by Jodi L. Miller The concept of the U.S. government paying reparations for wrongs it has committed is not a new one. In 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court awarded the Sioux Nation a $100 million judgment for land that the government took from them in 1877, which violated a...
What’s the Price for Righting A Wrong?

What’s the Price for Righting A Wrong?

by Phyllis Raybin Emert When a wrong has been committed, it is natural for the injured party to seek reparations to right that wrong. Compensation can be in the form of cash; however, when the perpetrator of the wrong is the government, reparations can also take the...
A Fair Fight Against Voter Suppression

A Fair Fight Against Voter Suppression

by Jodi L. Miller Changes in voting practices or requirements to vote often seem minor. But those minor changes can have a big impact and are, in fact, examples of voter suppression. For instance, one voter suppression tactic is closure of polling places. Is that a...